Blog

Latest Entries

MANAGEMENT- TIP OF THE DAY: Ask Your Remote Employees How They Want to Receive Their Appraisals


 

It’s hard to have a difficult conversation with a person in another location. Without seeing and hearing contextual clues tone of voice, facial expression, gestures misunderstandings can easily arise. You may want to give feedback by video, but for a sensitive conversation like a performance review, ask your direct report how they’d be most comfortable meeting. Sure, video conferencing will allow for a more nuanced conversation, but if speaking by phone would put your employee more at ease, comply with their wishes. The more often you communicate by video during the course of the year, the more comfortable both of you will be using the medium. But if it’s not something you do often, don’t insist on it for an appraisal. Applying an unfamiliar technology to a conversation that’s already anxiety-inducing may only make it more stressful for your employee.



MANAGEMENT- TIP OF THE DAY: What to Focus on When You Don’t Get Feedback from Your Boss


 

If you work for a boss who doesn’t provide feedback, it’s easy to feel rudderless. Fortunately, performance evaluation data shows that there are things most managers look for in their employees. Delivering results is a clear one, managers are consistently impressed when their direct reports are able to achieve goals on schedule. Quality of work matters too, of course. Managers also highly rate people who are trustworthy, communicate well, and have technical expertise. So if your boss won’t tell you what they’re looking for, consider how you stack up against these general expectations. How much output do you generate, compared with the rest of your team, and what is the quality of the work you turn in? Identify gaps and focus on working toward these expectations. With any luck, your boss will take notice.

Image result for proactive staff


Source: Adapted from “How to Improve at Work When You’re Not Getting Feedback,” by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman


 

 

MANAGEMENT- TIP OF THE DAY: What to Focus on When You Don’t Get Feedback from Your Boss


 

If you work for a boss who doesn’t provide feedback, it’s easy to feel rudderless. Fortunately, performance evaluation data shows that there are things most managers look for in their employees. Delivering results is a clear one, managers are consistently impressed when their direct reports are able to achieve goals on schedule. Quality of work matters too, of course. Managers also highly rate people who are trustworthy, communicate well, and have technical expertise. So if your boss won’t tell you what they’re looking for, consider how you stack up against these general expectations. How much output do you generate, compared with the rest of your team, and what is the quality of the work you turn in? Identify gaps and focus on working toward these expectations. With any luck, your boss will take notice.

Image result for proactive staff


Source: Adapted from “How to Improve at Work When You’re Not Getting Feedback,” by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman


 

 

MANAGEMENT- TIP OF THE DAY: To Learn Something, Explain It to Yourself Out Loud


 

Talking to yourself can get you funny looks from other people. But muttering under your breath can be a helpful way to learn a new concept or skill. When you’re studying something new, either reading about it or listening to others explain it, take the time to pause and summarize out loud what you’re learning. This serves two purposes: First, it slows you down and when you’re more deliberate, you gain more from the learning experience. Second, it cements the new knowledge by forcing you to consider questions like “What do I find confusing? Do I really know this well enough to explain it?” Whether you hit the pause button while listening to a podcast, or stop to reflect while reading a manual, tell yourself what you’re learning maybe just don’t do it in public.


Source: Adapted from “Talking to Yourself (Out Loud) Can Help You Learn,” by Ulrich Boser







MANAGEMENT- TIP OF THE DAY: Convince Your Boss to Let You Work Remotely


 

Working from home has lots of benefits: zero commute, higher productivity, and periods of quiet, uninterrupted time. But don’t expect your boss to let you work remotely unless you make a convincing case for it. Consider your specific role and what a realistic remote work schedule would look like: Is it to work Tuesdays and Thursdays from home? Every other Friday? Or would flex hours suffice? Then consider what might worry your manager, and think of ways to preempt those concerns. For instance, you might offer to come in for an important Friday meeting, even if that’s your work-from-home day. And when you have an unplanned chance to work from home, like during a snowstorm, seize the opportunity to demonstrate how productive you can be outside the office.